Laboratories

Plant Growth Regulation

Outline of Research and Education

Because plant cells are surrounded by a rigid cell wall, they cannot - unlike animal cells - move within organs. Therefore, plants control cell division and cell growth in a precise, spatiotemporal manner to achieve proper development of organs under changing environmental conditions. However, little is known about how cell division and growth is regulated, and how plants maintain DNA integrity during organ growth and development. We focus on the molecular mechanisms underlying DNA polyploidization and DNA damage response, and also on organ size control. Our studies will uncover how internal and external factors, such as plant hormones and environmental stress, converge onto the machineries controlling cell division and growth, thus developing technologies to increase plant biomass.

Major Research Topics

DNA polyploidization (Fig.1, Fig.2)

  • Control of the transition from cell division (mitotic cycle) to endoreplication (endocycle)
  • Epigenetic regulation of competence in DNA polyploidization
  • Development of technologies increasing biomass productivity in poplars

DNA damage response

  • DNA damage checkpoints controlled by transcription factor SOG1
  • Stem cell maintenance under DNA damage conditions
  • Crosstalk between DNA damage response and defense response

Organ size control (Fig.3)

  • Epidermis-derived signals controlling cell division in internal tissues
  • Crosstalk between brassinosteroid signaling and cytokinin biosynthesis
  • Control of cell-to-cell communication by very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs)

References

  1. Kobayashi K. et al., EMBO J., 34, 1992-2007, 2015
  2. Takatsuka H. et al., Plant J., 82, 1004-1017, 2015
  3. Yin K. et al., Plant J., 80, 541-552, 2014
  4. Takatsuka H. and Umeda M., J. Exp. Bot., 65, 2633-2643, 2014
  5. Yi D. et al., Plant Cell, 26, 296-309, 2014
  6. Takahashi N. et al., Curr. Biol., 23, 1812-1817, 2013
  7. Yoshiyama K.O. et al., EMBO Rep., 14, 817-822, 2013
  8. Nobusawa T. et al., PLOS Biol., 11, e1001531, 2013
  9. Breuer et al., EMBO J., 31, 4488-4501, 2012
  10. Endo M. et al., Plant J., 69, 967-977, 2012
  11. Adachi S. et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 108, 10004-10009, 2011
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  13. Adachi S. et al., Dev. Biol., 329, 306-314, 2009
  14. Takatsuka H. et al., Plant J., 59, 475-487, 2009
  15. Kono A. et al., Plant Cell, 19, 1265-1277, 2007
  16. Yamaguchi M. et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 100, 8019-8023, 2003
  17. Umeda M. et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 97, 13396-13400, 2000
Fig. 1 Cell cycle regulation in root growth.
Fig. 1 Cell cycle regulation in root growth.
Fig. 2 Development of high-biomass plants by induction of DNA polyploidization.
Fig. 2 Development of high-biomass plants by induction of DNA polyploidization.
Fig. 3 Epidermis-derived signals control organ size. VLCFA, very-long-chain fatty acids; PAS2, PASTICCINO2.
Fig. 3 Epidermis-derived signals control organ size. VLCFA, very-long-chain fatty acids; PAS2, PASTICCINO2.
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