Biomedical Science

By clarifying the mechanisms of cell signaling and response, we are conducting research to determine the etiology of cancer, neurological diseases, and other diseases and to develop life-changing drugs.

Topics

  1. Cellular functions and regulatory mechanisms of G protein signaling
  2. Monoclonal antibodies against orphan adhesion GPCRs involved in tumorigenesis and neural function
  3. Role of adhesion GPCRs in breast cancer
  4. Formation and function of primary cilia
Signal transduction mediated by G protein- coupled receptor
The most distinctive feature of our laboratory is that all three faculty members were trained to be physicians at the university's medical school. Therefore, our laboratory always keeps human diseases in mind and promotes basic research on their pathogenesis and therapeutics.

Topics

  1. Elucidation of the real physiological functions of PD-1
  2. Development of novel strategies in cancer immunotherapy
Some people say that PD-1 was discovered only by chance

Tumor Cell Biology

kato Jun-ya

Prof. KATO Jun-ya
We explore differentiation mechanisms that regulate tumor cell growth, differentiation, and survival.

Topics

  1. Cell cycle control and oncogenesis
  2. Leukemogenesis
  3. Hematopoietic stem cells
 Cell cycle and cyclin/Cdk complexes
In the Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation, we study innate immune responses to viruses and bacteria. Innate immunity is a gateway to immune responses and is a biological defense necessary for induction of inflammatory responses and acquired immunity. By elucidating the mechanisms of innate immunity, we hope to develop vaccines and treat inflammatory diseases caused by the breakdown of innate immunity.

Topics

  1. Analysis of innate immune signaling pathways
  2. Analysis of RLRs
  3. Analysis of sensing mechanisms of endogenous molecules by PRRs
 Recognition of microbial components by Toll-like receptors (TLRs)
We study the construction of cells that takes place as a result of the combination of proteins and lipids and the formation of diseases by their disruption.

Topics

  1. Intracellular signaling depending on the morphology of the cell membrane and the proteins that form the morphology of the cell membrane, especially the association with cancer of the cell
  2. Cell morphological analysis by deep learning (AI)
 Examples of proteins (membrane-binding proteins such as actin, BAR domain, F-BAR domain, and I-BAR domain) and lipids that are responsible for cell morphogenesis targeted in the laboratory (from Suetsugu et al., Phys Rev 2014) ).The BAR domain acts as a polymer of protrusions (including filamentous and lamellipodia) and submicron scale invagination (eg, clathrin-coated holes and caveolae) to form microstructures. Typical sizes for clathrin-coated pores and caveolae are 100-200 nm in diameter and 50-100 nm in diameter, respectively. The BAR domain can be approximated as a 20-25 nm arc with a diameter of 3-6 nm. The thickness of the membrane is approximately 5 nm.

RNA Molecular Medicine

Katsutomo Okamura

Prof. Okamura
Our goal is to understand the mechanism of gene expression regulation using RNA as a keyword. This is an important field that can lead to the elucidation of the mechanisms by which genetic abnormalities cause diseases. In addition to classical biochemistry and genetics, we combine various techniques such as bioinformatics analysis, and students play a leading role in our research.

Topics

  1. How is expression of miRNAs controlled?
  2. Why are there many ways to produce miRNAs?
  3. How have small RNA pathways changed in evolution?
Gene regulatory networks and their importance in normal development and physiology.

Stem Cell Technologies

Akira Kurisaki

Prof. Kurisaki
Stem cell differentiation experiments require careful and detailed work, diligent cultivation of cells with a keen eye for observation, analysis of gene expression, and so on. If you are able to do this, it is a very enjoyable research field. Tissues are also very beautiful and impressive when viewed under a microscope.

Topics

  1. Generation of gastric tissues and their disease models
  2. Differentiation of lung tissue and tissue regeneration
 Stomach tissue differentiated from mouse ES cells in vitro by 3D culture method. (Left) HE staining of the differentiated stomach organoid (day 56). (Right) Immunofluorescent staining of stomach organoid with Epcam antibody (red), Desmin antibody (green), and DAPI (blue) for epidermis, mesenchyme, and nuclei, respectively. Stomach organoid with gastric glands and mesenchyme can be differentiated from ES cells in vitro.
We study the mechanisms by which animal organs are formed and how their functions are maintained throughout life. In particular, we use genetically mutated mice, embryonic stem cells, and chick embryos as models to clarify how developmental and functional abnormalities occur at the cellular level and to develop treatments for them.

Topics

  1. Mechanisms leading to pattern formation and size control of the developing central nervous system
  2. Homeostasis of postnatal cells
A chick embryo incubated for 4 days.
Chimeric animals, in which cells with different genomic information are mixed together in one individual, is one of the animal models artificially created by developmental engineering technology. Such chimeric animals have contributed to the development of life science research, including the analysis of gene function. In our laboratory, we use chimeric animals to study the mechanisms of individual development and organogenesis, which can lead to regenerative medicine.

Topics

  1. Model of organ formation using xenogeneic chimeras
  2. Trials of novel animal models
Two kinds of mouse and rat xenogeneic chimeras. A rat-sized xenogeneic chimera which produced mouse ES cells injected into rat blastocysts (upper). A mouse-sized xenogeneic chimera which produced rat ES cells injected into mouse blastocysts (bottom).